Podcast: Teaching LGBTQ Psychology

Despite the prominence of LGBTQ issues in our current social consciousness, many people still know little about the LGBTQ community, which means that teaching about this community and its issues is an important job. It’s also a difficult one that’s been handled with varying degrees of effectiveness and sensitivity over the past few decades. Many of us can recall during our undergrad or graduate training having a single class day devoted to the topic, or our instructors trying to ‘squeeze it in’ alongside other material. Fortunately, the teaching of LGBTQ issues has advanced dramatically, thanks to the work of psychologists such as Theodore Burnes and Jeanne Stanley. Their new edited book, entitled Teaching LGBTQ Psychology: Queering Innovative Pedagogy and Practice (2017, American Psychological Association), covers pedagogical concepts as well as practical suggestions for bringing the material to life and helping students feel at home with it. In our interview, we have a frank discussion about the challenges of teaching LGBTQ psychology—such as fear, prejudice, and misinformation among students—and how to best rise to those challenges.

Theodore Burnes is associate professor and director of the LGBT specialization of Antioch University’s clinical psychology master’s program. He has 15 years of experience constructing, facilitating, and evaluating undergraduate and graduate coursework in psychology, Black studies, writing, LGBT studies, poetry, women’s studies, teacher education, and counseling in various university settings. He is a licensed psychologist and licensed professional clinical counselor in private practice in Los Angeles.

Jeanne Stanley is Executive Director of Watershed Counseling and Consultation Services. She regularly conducts training around the country on best practices for supporting and affirming LGBTQ individuals and is a licensed psychologist in private practice in the Chestnut Hill are of Philadelphia.

Listen to our interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: Rising to the Top

Most psychology books are written by experts with knowledge deriving from professional experience—for which we are grateful. Occasionally, a psychologist ventures to write a book that draws from intimate personal experience to illuminate important psychological phenomena. Such is the case with our guest this week, Shelvy Haywood Keglar. In his book Underdog to top dog: An improbable rise (published in 2017 in association with IBJ Book Publishing), Dr. Keglar describes his journey from poverty and rural life, through racism and segregation, to the fulfillment and success he enjoys now. He talks with me about what inspired him to document his personal journey and the hard-earned lessons he imparts to young Black men in search of hope and guidance. To the extent that dreaming is a basic human enterprise, Dr. Keglar’s experiences and wisdom strike universal chords.

Shelvy Haywood Keglar is a psychologist, and founder and president of Midwest Psychological Center, Inc. He also serves as staff member at Community Hospital and Fairbanks Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana. He has taught at Indiana University Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry. Prior publications have been in the areas of personality assessment, addictions, and adolescent psychology

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: The Power of Seeing Differently

We may think we see the world as it is, but neuroscience proves otherwise. Which is a good thing, according to neuroscientist and author Beau Lotto. In his new book Deviate: The Science of Seeing Differently (2017, Hatchette Books), Lotto explains the mechanisms underlying our difficulty apprehending the world accurately, their implications for our relationships with one another and the world, and the creative potential that is unleashed when we embrace uncertainty and doubt. These issues come to life in our interview, as we discuss his discoveries in and out of the lab and their application to everyday experiences.

Beau Lotto is a neuroscientist specializing in the biology and psychology of perception with more than 25 years experience conducting research on human perception and behavior and over 60 publications. He is Professor at University of London (Goldsmiths) and visiting scholar at New York University, as well as founder and CEO of the Lab of Misfits, a creative agency grounded in principles of perception. Follow Beau on Twitter.

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: Psychoanalysis & Democracy in Conversation

Psychoanalysis has a reputation for insularity, often limiting its interest and scope to events in the consulting room. But the origins of Freud's notion of free speech bear meaningful similarities to the Founding Fathers' conception of free speech, sparking curiosity about how psychoanalysis and democracy might speak to one another. In her recent book, Feminine Law: Freud, Free Speech, and the Voice of Desire (Karnac, 2016), author Jill Gentile starts up such a conversation and makes a cogent argument for how psychoanalysis might contribute to a truly free and robust democratic political system. In our interview, we discuss how she stumbled upon the ever-evolving journey of documenting these links and how the feminine body is the missing piece in understanding what free speech truly means.

Jill Gentile, Ph.D. is faculty at NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and training and supervising analyst at the Institute for the Psychoanalytic Study of Subjectivity. Her essays, describing a semiotic and phenomenological trajectory of agency, desire, and symbolic life, have been published in many psychoanalytic journals. She is founding member of the DreamTank collective, dedicated to the application of psychoanalysis to democracy and to the public sphere. She is also a practicing psychoanalyst in Manhattan, NY and Highland Park, NJ. Follow her on Twitter.

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: The Business Approach to Love

Most books on the psychology of love relationships emphasize feelings, but Michael and Sarah Bennett’s new book F*ck Love: One shrink’s sensible advice for finding a lasting relationship (Touchstone, 2017) takes a uniquely business-like approach to the topic. In so doing, these authors make a compelling argument for why long-lasting relationships depend more on quality of partnership than romance, and they offer concrete, practical guidelines for establishing and maintaining solid partnership. The book is humorous in tone but serious in purpose, as you’ll hear in our interview. They talk with me about the clinical work and personal experiences which inspired their approach and offer sage advice about relationships.

Dr. Michael Bennett is a Harvard-educated, board-certified psychiatrist in private practice in Boston. Sarah Bennett is a writer for magazines, television, books, the Internet, and for sketch comedy, most notably the Upright Citizens Brigade in New York. Their prior book is entitled F*ck Feelings: One Shrink's Practical Advice for Managing All Life's Impossible Problems (Simon & Schuster, 2015)

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: The Psychology of Organizations

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Psychological and psychoanalytic principles are often associated with individuals and therapist-client pairs, though they have plenty to bear on understanding and helping organizations in trouble. In particular, a psychoanalytic lens can uncover unconsciously-held beliefs members hold, about one another and about the organization as a whole, that impede effective functioning. In his new book, Discovering Organizational Identity: Dynamics of Relational Attachment (2016, University of Missouri), organizational consultant and researcher Michael Diamond explores the complex role of organizational identity in the life and success of organizations. In our interview, he explains what an organizational identity is and how its identification and articulation can help heal long-standing splits and enhance reflection and communication in even the most troubled organizations. His wisdom from 35 years of experience in this field is relevant for anyone who starts, leads, or works in an organization.

Dr. Michael Diamond is Professor Emeritus of Public Affairs and Organization Studies, University of Missouri, Columbia. His more than 35 years of writing and research are focused on the nexus of psychoanalysis, organizational politics, and culture. His prior books include The Unconscious Life of Organizations: Interpreting Organizational Identity (1993, Praeger) and Private Selves in Public Organizations (2009, Palgrave Macmillan).

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: Redefining Perversion

The wish to transcend one’s mortality, and the anxiety associated with being unable to do so, are universal human experiences. People deal with these in their idiosyncratic ways, often by transgressing rules and boundaries that serve as the parameters of civilized human coexistence. Technological advances expand our capacities for transcending our limitations, especially when they allow us to objectify other humans and humanize our objects. Such forms of perversion are the subject of Danielle Knafo and Rocco Lo Bosco’s new book, The Age of Perversion: Desire and Technology in Psychoanalysis and Culture. In my interview with Knafo, we explore her redefinition of perversion and her view on it’s current and future manifestations—and what it implies for the survival of humanity.

Danielle Knafo is a professor in the clinical psychology doctoral program at Long Island University and faculty member and supervisor in New York University’s postdoctoral program in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. She has lectured internationally and published extensively, including her prior book, Dancing with the Unconscious, published in 2012 also by Routledge.

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: Navigating the Cultural Divide

Literature and training in diversity and multiculturalism typically emphasize cultural differences—how to identify them, and the importance of honoring them. But does such an emphasis neglect other important dimensions of cross-cultural relating? Brent Willock, Lori Bohm, and Rebecca Curtis, editors of the book Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Identity and Difference: Navigating the Divide (Routledge, 2017), argue that finding similarities in our universal human longings and experiences are also key. Their book contains contributions from various experts describing how they ‘navigate the divide’ of difference, with patient, everyday people, and within themselves. In our interview, we delve into these topics and discuss clinical and non-clinical examples to illustrate how these concepts come to life. Our discussion, and the book, are timely and relevant to our universal struggle to understand and connect with one another.

Brent Willock is president of the Toronto Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, Board Member of the Canadian Institute for Child and Adolescent Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, and on the faculty of the Institute for the Advancement of Self Psychology.

Lori Bohm is Supervising Analyst and Faculty at the William Alanson White Institute, and former Director of their Center for Applied Psychoanalysis and Intensive Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Programs.

Rebecca Curtis is Professor of Psychology at Adelphi University, as well as Faculty and Supervisor at the William Alanson White Institute, and Supervisor at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies.

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to my New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: Differing Child-Rearing Practices Across Societies

Developmental psychology seems to tell us how to best to raise our children into competent and decent adults. However, comparing our theories and practices to those of other cultures raises questions about whether our ideas are ethnocentric. This topic is at the center of anthropologist David F. Lancy’s latest book, The Anthropology of Childhood: Cherubs, Chattel, Changelines, 2nd edition (2015, Cambridge University Press). In his book, he offers a comprehensive review of cross-cultural research pertaining to societies’ treatment of children and argues that Western practices around child-rearing are out of step with those of the rest of the world. In our interview, he explains how our neontocratic orientation differs from most other societies’ gerontocratic values and offers some fresh ways of thinking about aspects of everyday family life.

David F. Lancy is Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at Utah State University, and author/editor of several books on childhood and culture, including Playing on the Mother Ground: Cultural Routines for Children’s Learning (1996), Studying Children and Schools (2001), and The Anthropology of Learning in Childhood (2010). He also authors the Psychology Today blogpost Benign Neglect.

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2

Podcast: Diverse Approaches to Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy is a form of treatment for human suffering that is increasingly misunderstood by the people who seek it. Once the dominant force in psychology, it now gets confused with or supplanted by shorter, more symptom-focused treatments preferred by health insurance companies. True psychotherapy, according to author and psychotherapist Jo Frasca, takes its time in unraveling and healing the archaic wounds that cause our most troubling symptoms. In her book Delving deeper: Understanding diverse approaches while exploring psychotherapy, she uses anecdotes and lessons from her years of clinical practice to clarify how psychotherapy differs from psychiatry, social work, counseling, and other treatments, and she offers a compelling argument for the unique rewards of a well-conducted psychotherapeutic treatment. In our interview, we discuss what motivated her to put these convictions into book form and her suggestions for how to find high-quality, effective treatments.

Jo Frasca is a psychotherapist in private practice in Sydney, Australia, combining Transactional Analysis and the relational model in her work, informed by psychoanalytic theory and thinking. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

Listen to the interview by clicking below. To subscribe to the New Books in Psychology podcast, click here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/new-books-in-psychology/id436024959?mt=2